Quotes

A collection of passages and quotes I liked from my most recent reads.

Featured
"I act with paintings the way I act with things…I make a window the way I look through a window. If the open window isn’t any good in my picture, I paint a curtain and close the window the way I would in a room."
Pablo Picasso
all quotes
"This heart within me I can feel, and I judge that it exists. This world I can touch and I likewise judge that it exists. There ends all my knowledge and the rest is construction."
Albert Camus
"Life is a dream, and it is well that it is so, or who could survive some of its experiences?"
Isadora Duncan
My Life (Restored Edition)
Isadora
"During her authorship the scantly scribbled pages accumulated like white leaves, left to drift over her studio floor. Then, as in all the frequent crisis in her life, her friends rallied around her with scenes, jealousies, memories, quarrels, recriminations, good cases of wine, fine conversation, threats of farewell, new leases of affection–all the dramatics of loyalty, disillusion, hero worship, duty, fatigue, patience, and devotion which animated even her Platonic associations–all the humorous and painful disorders which genius, as if to prove its exceptional chemistry, catalyzes in commoner lives."
Janet Flanner
An American in Paris — Profile of an Interlude between two Wars
The French Lily
"She is one of those shapely little women with the will of a giant. Psychologists would cite her as an example of their compensation theory–a case where expansion of the volition makes up for the limits of the flesh, a hypothesis which in small men, and granted the eighteenth century, can make Napoleons."
Janet Flanner
An American in Paris — Profile of an Interlude between two Wars
"I act with paintings the way I act with things…I make a window the way I look through a window. If the open window isn’t any good in my picture, I paint a curtain and close the window the way I would in a room."
Pablo Picasso
An American in Paris — Profile of an Interlude between two Wars
"Apparently men’s minds are of two sorts–those which attract interest and those which supply it. Those whose minds attract are the special few: the painters, writers, poets, philosophers, thinkers, messiahs, potters, jewel-setters, glass blowers, missal illuminators, or artists and artisans in general. Those who supply interest in these special few are the unspecial millions. The fragile pieces of paper or canvas or the easily effaceable records of passion, utopias, belief, human hope, godhead, or the portrait of the beloved–all these delicate documentations which the special few leave behind, the unspecial millions father and save in the memory, museums, universities, libraries, civilizations, or dresser drawers."
Janet Flanner
An American in Paris — Profile of an Interlude between two Wars